Thursday, January 14, 2010

Article that links ecstasy use with sleep apnea

Hey again, so I came across this article I found interesteing, while looking for some information on central sleep apnea products. The takeaway message for me from the article is that scientists say they found that users of ecstasy had upwards of eight times the risk of sleep apnea or shallow breathing episodes while asleep compared with those who did not use the drug, and only users of the drug had moderate or severe sleep apnea, with eight cases of moderate sleep apnea and one case of severe apnea detected.  The full article can be read here. Although the article did not specify central sleep apnea versus obstructive sleep apnea, discussions of neurochemical communication lead me to believe that it is relevant in certain cases.

One aspect that the article brings up is that the brain chemical serotonin, which contributes to neuronal communication, seems to be affected by ecstasy after minimal use. I wonder if the amount of serotonin available for neuronal communication is affected or if the ability of serotonin to communicate those messages is affected. Would the youth who use ecstasy multiple times then be pre-disposed to the development of central sleep apnea following continued use, trauma to the spinal column, or the development of another co-morbid condition such as congestive heart failure or Parkinson's disease?

Mike M., RN BSN
Owner of centralsleepapnea.blogspot.com

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  3. Interesting...
    Way back in the 70's/80's, I did "MDA" (as a teen and into my early 20's; I'm now 55). I have a severe case of central (or complex) apnea (60 events per hour during REM sleep, tachy/brady episodes (if I got that right). I'm also prone to mild depression (and for a year or two tried prozac and wellbutrin (before I found God who helped me more than any drug). But this is very interesting to think there could be a connection. But what I personally think is the cause of my central apnea (and my holistically oriented MD tends to agree... He's an internal med and pulmonary doctor but thinks "outside the box") is hemochromatosis. I verified by blood tests that when I eat like a "normal" person, my transferrin saturation count will be at 100%. They can't measure above that--And chances are at that point there's a ton of free radical iron going through my bloodstream. I ALWAYS notice a difference in brain function at these times (tho now I try to eat low iron) but also, had my WORST EVER experience of central sleep apnea (which cause me to finally get it diagnosed) after having given blood at Red Cross. My body (and this is normal, says my hematologist) "over reacts" after having given blood as follows. It's like it says,"Oh no lost blood--Let's rebuild!" and takes TOO MUCH iron out of storage--way to much to be properly transported in the blood by transferrin. The particular epidsode I had after Red Cross, literally brought my central apnea into almost full consicousness every time I feel asleep. I felt like I was fighting for my life for 5 days. I wanted to sleep more desparately than anything in life, and as I'd fall asleep (probably be in that light stage of sleep where you still have some consciousness) I'd watched my breathing slow down, slow down, slow down, stop. Within less than a minute (20 seconds? longer? no idea) my body would realize the oxygen deprivation and my heart would start racing and I'd wake up--And during these 5 days, it was SO BAD that I wouldn't even start to breathe automatically once I woke up. I'd literally have to TELL my lungs to breathe in, breath out, and after a short while they would start to breathe again on their own. Thank God in a way though--Because I had NO IDEA what was wrong with me until then I just knew I was utterly exhausted. No tell tale snoring or anything that I would have had with obstructive apnea to alert me to my problem. Anyway, nowadays I still feel the torment of being conscious of the stopping of breathing as I fall asleep (especially if I don't use my machine, which is about 50% of the time). Of course they say it's "normal" to have centrals as you fall asleep--But when they are CAUSED by a brain problem like this it's not normal and it's pretty horrible. Which makes me want to launch into my next subject--hypopneas in a Central case!--But I'll comment elsewhere on that. But the medical profession should REALLY change the way they diagnose Central apnea it makes no sense.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Interesting...
    Way back in the 70's/80's, I did "MDA" (as a teen and into my early 20's; I'm now 55). I have a severe case of central (or complex) apnea (60 events per hour during REM sleep, tachy/brady episodes (if I got that right). I'm also prone to mild depression (and for a year or two tried prozac and wellbutrin (before I found God who helped me more than any drug). But this is very interesting to think there could be a connection. But what I personally think is the cause of my central apnea (and my holistically oriented MD tends to agree... He's an internal med and pulmonary doctor but thinks "outside the box") is hemochromatosis. I verified by blood tests that when I eat like a "normal" person, my transferrin saturation count will be at 100%. They can't measure above that--And chances are at that point there's a ton of free radical iron going through my bloodstream. I ALWAYS notice a difference in brain function at these times (tho now I try to eat low iron) but also, had my WORST EVER experience of central sleep apnea (which cause me to finally get it diagnosed) after having given blood at Red Cross. My body (and this is normal, says my hematologist) "over reacts" after having given blood as follows. It's like it says,"Oh no lost blood--Let's rebuild!" and takes TOO MUCH iron out of storage--way to much to be properly transported in the blood by transferrin. The particular epidsode I had after Red Cross, literally brought my central apnea into almost full consicousness every time I feel asleep. I felt like I was fighting for my life for 5 days. I wanted to sleep more desparately than anything in life, and as I'd fall asleep (probably be in that light stage of sleep where you still have some consciousness) I'd watched my breathing slow down, slow down, slow down, stop. Within less than a minute (20 seconds? longer? no idea) my body would realize the oxygen deprivation and my heart would start racing and I'd wake up--And during these 5 days, it was SO BAD that I wouldn't even start to breathe automatically once I woke up. I'd literally have to TELL my lungs to breathe in, breath out, and after a short while they would start to breathe again on their own. Thank God in a way though--Because I had NO IDEA what was wrong with me until then I just knew I was utterly exhausted. No tell tale snoring or anything that I would have had with obstructive apnea to alert me to my problem. Anyway, nowadays I still feel the torment of being conscious of the stopping of breathing as I fall asleep (especially if I don't use my machine, which is about 50% of the time). Of course they say it's "normal" to have centrals as you fall asleep--But when they are CAUSED by a brain problem like this it's not normal and it's pretty horrible. Which makes me want to launch into my next subject--hypopneas in a Central case!--But I'll comment elsewhere on that. But the medical profession should REALLY change the way they diagnose Central apnea it makes no sense.

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  5. Thank you for sharing interesting and worthy information in regard to sleep apnea.

    ReplyDelete